Rocket-Powered Bicycle Leaves Ferrari F430 Scuderia In The Dust!

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With its slightly elongated frame, thick tires, normal brakes and pedals, Francois Gissy's two-wheeler looks just like any other high-end customized bike. However look closer, and you will notice a modification like none other - rocket thrusters that are filled with concentrated liquid hydrogen peroxide that help the daredevil attain speeds that no man has reached before, on a bicycle.

The French adventurer first attempted rocket-bicycling in May 2013, when he added a single rocket engine to an otherwise ordinary bike and set a new land speed record of 263km/h (163 mph). In October of the same year, he affixed two rocket engines to the bike and accelerated to a top speed of 285 km/h in just 6.7 seconds! What was amazing about the race that look place in Interlaken, Switzerland, was that it was conducted on just 790-meters (2,590 feet) of track. Gissy used about half or 350 meters to get to the top speed and the rest, to bring his speeding bike to a stop.

On November 13th, 2014, the Frenchman decided to challenge his own record once again, by fitting his bike with three rockets. Given that his plan was to get to a top speed of 300km/h, it was only fitting that he attempted the race at France's Circuit Paul Ricard, a track that is normally reserved for Formula One races. Sure enough, as soon as the engines fired up, Gissy accelerated to a top speed of 333 km/h in a mere 4.8 seconds.

Not surprisingly, he left the Ferrari 430 Scuderia that was 'racing' alongside, in the dust! While the 503-horsepower beast is powerful enough to zip past any vehicle, it's paltry acceleration of 62mph in 3.6 seconds, was no match for the rocket-powered two-wheeler.

Gissy, who likens his races to going downhill riding on a speed skiing slope is of course still not satisfied with the new record. He wants to attempt the race again and attain over 400km/hr - We wonder how many rocket thrusters he will need to do that!

Resources: wired.com,gizmag.com

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